PhD Project: Team Behaviour

British Grand Prix 2012 - Silverstone

Applications are invited from potential PhD students with a background in psychology, management or sociology who have an interest in exploring group processes.

Cranfield has a unique data base of records of team interactions using the ‘QOIT’ process (Kwiatkowski et al. 2002). Interaction patterns, communications, effectiveness data, self and other perceptions on a meeting by meeting basis, as well as detailed narrative accounts and psychometric data for some hundreds of people is available. This is a rich and unique data source. Applications are invited from people interested in undertaking research to answer questions relevant to the managerial psychology domain, for example, examining the nuances of group formation and performance, or the time related impact of individual differences on group functioning, or the application of psychological models, or the role of self-awareness and insight, or difference in narrative accounts and perceptions across individuals, teams and cultures. An interest in quantitative as well as qualitative research would be a distinct advantage.

A minimum of a 2.1 (or equivalent) standard at first degree is preferred.
Please see Admission Requirements for English language requirements.

Funding may be available if applications are made before the end of April 2015.

In the first instance please contact Richard Kwiatkowski on richard.kwiatkowski@cranfield.ac.uk or by phone on 01234 751122 x3223.

Thurs 19th March: Cranfield School of Management Doctoral Open Day

PhD Project: Professional Ethics

British Grand Prix 2012 - Silverstone

Applications are invited from people with a background in psychology, philosophy, sociology or management who have an interest in ethics.

An opportunity exists to examine ethics and, in particular, in utilising the principles underpinning professional codes and thinking in the much more contested managerial domain. The supervisor, Dr Richard Kwiatkowski, has a long standing interest in Ethics, having chaired the British Psychological Society’s and the School of Management’s Ethics Committees. He is currently leading an innovative redesign of the University Ethics system. He has contributed to a number of professional codes and sets of guidelines and presented papers at a variety of conferences in this area.

A minimum of a 2.1 (or equivalent) standard at first degree is preferred.
Please see Admission Requirements for English language requirements.

Scholarships may be available if applications are made before the end of April 2015.

In the first instance please contact Richard Kwiatkowski on richard.kwiatkowski@cranfield.ac.uk or by phone on 01234 751122 x3223.

Thurs 19th March: Cranfield School of Management Doctoral Open Day

PhD Project: Political Psychology

British Grand Prix 2012 - Silverstone

Applications are invited from potential PhD students with a background in psychology, management, sociology or political science who have an interest in politics.

Politics is presently a relatively neglected part of mainstream organizational thinking and especially industrial psychology. An opportunity exists to undertake research at doctoral level in the political arena, and especially in applying psychological and management thinking. A variety of theoretical approaches could legitimately be applied to extend thinking in this area, (for example) the supervisor, Dr Richard Kwiatkowski, is particularly interested in understanding political actors within organizations; and, in the case of this study, those overtly identified as politicians (e.g. members of the UK Parliament). A significant set of confidential longitudinal interviews exist with a panel of UK MPs exploring issues related to the job, the party, the culture and organizational change in the House of Commons.

A minimum of a 2.1 (or equivalent) standard at first degree is preferred.
Please see Admission Requirements for English language requirements.

Scholarships may be available if applications are made before the end of April 2015.

In the first instance please contact Richard Kwiatkowski on richard.kwiatkowski@cranfield.ac.uk or by phone on 01234 751122 x3223.

Thurs 19th March: Cranfield School of Management Doctoral Open Day

PhD Project: Islamic Entrepreneurship – The Concept, Definition and Practical Implications

British Grand Prix 2012 - Silverstone

Over the past few years, scholars have started looking into the impact of religion on different aspects of modern business practices such as:

  • Work and ethics (Gundolf and Filser, 2013)
  • Marketing best practices (Temporal, 2011; Rinallo et al., 2013)
  • Entrepreneurial performance (Neubert, 2013).

In his recent work around Islam and Entrepreneurship at the University of Oxford, Guemuesay (2014) coined the term ‘Entrepreneurship from an Islamic Perspective (EIP)’. The concept is “based on three interconnected pillars: entrepreneurial, socio-economic/ethical and religio-spiritual” (Guemuesay, 2014: 1). The research highlights the work of other authors (Adas, 2006; Basu and Altinay, 2002; Kayed and Hassan, 2010; Roomi and Harrison, 2010; Roomi, 2013) looking at how Islam shapes entrepreneurship at different levels of the economy whilst encouraging and enabling entrepreneurial activities.

The authors in the field have investigated the Islamic ethical approach of doing business from two perspectives: first, the institutional approach – emphasising upon the need for Islamic financial and banking institutions; and second, the individual approach – for entrepreneurs to “adhere to Islamic, ethical values while conducting everyday business activities” (Kayed and Hassan, 2010: 403). However, no study has been conducted so far, to map out different aspects of entrepreneurship (characteristics, skills and practices) with Islamic teachings (Quran and Sunnah) or to determine the relationship between entrepreneurial success and practising of Islamic principles. This project aims to fill this gap.

Supervisors: Dr Muhammad Azam Roomi and Dr Stephanie Hussels

Application Details: The PhD candidate should hold a minimum 2.1 class undergraduate degree in business and management, sociology, psychology, social psychology, anthropology or related discipline and have passed, or expect to have passed by autumn 2015, a Master’s degree or equivalent research experience in a work setting. See Admission Requirements for English language requirements.

Funding Details: Funding may be available on a competitive basis through the Cranfield School of Management studentship scheme.

Deadline: Expressions of interest alongside a CV are invited via email to: muhammad.roomi@cranfield.ac.uk and stephanie.hussels@cranfield.ac.uk mid-April 2015 for bursary applications or end of July 2015 for self-funded applications.

References:
Adas, E.B. (2006). The Making of Entrepreneurial Islam and the Islamic Spirit of Capitalism. Journal for Cultural Research, 10 (2): 113-137.
Basu, A. and Altinay, E. (2002). The interaction between culture and entrepreneurship in London’s immigrant businesses. International Small Business Journal, 20(4): 371-393.
Guemuesay, A.A. (2012). Boundaries and knowledge in a Sufi Dhikr Circle, Journal of Management Development, 31(10): 1079-1089.
Guemuesay, A.A. (2014). Entrepreneurship from an Islamic Perspective, Journal of Business Ethics (Forthcoming). Available at http://linl.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10551-014-2223-7.
Gundolf, K. and Filser, M. (2013). Management Research and Religion: A Citation Analysis. Journal of Business Ethics, 112(1): 177-185.
Kayed, R. N. and Hassan, K. (2010). Islamic entrepreneurship. London: Routledge.
Neubert, M. J. (2013). Entrepreneurs Feel Closer to God Than the Rest of Us Do. Harvard Business Review, 91 (10): 32-33.
Rinallo, D., Scott, L. and MacLaran, P. (2013). Consumption and Spirituality. New York: Routledge.
Roomi M.A. (2013). Entrepreneurial Capital, Social Values and Islamic Traditions: Exploring the Growth of Women-owned Enterprises in Pakistan. International Small Business Journal, 31 (2) 175-191.
Roomi, M. A. and Harrison, P. (2010). Behind the veil: women-only entrepreneurship training in Pakistan. International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, 2(2): 150 – 172.
Temporal, P. (2011). Islamic Branding and Marketing. Asia: Wiley.

Thurs 19th March: Cranfield School of Management Doctoral Open Day

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