PhD Project: Islamic Entrepreneurship – The Concept, Definition and Practical Implications

British Grand Prix 2012 - Silverstone

Over the past few years, scholars have started looking into the impact of religion on different aspects of modern business practices such as:

  • Work and ethics (Gundolf and Filser, 2013)
  • Marketing best practices (Temporal, 2011; Rinallo et al., 2013)
  • Entrepreneurial performance (Neubert, 2013).

In his recent work around Islam and Entrepreneurship at the University of Oxford, Guemuesay (2014) coined the term ‘Entrepreneurship from an Islamic Perspective (EIP)’. The concept is “based on three interconnected pillars: entrepreneurial, socio-economic/ethical and religio-spiritual” (Guemuesay, 2014: 1). The research highlights the work of other authors (Adas, 2006; Basu and Altinay, 2002; Kayed and Hassan, 2010; Roomi and Harrison, 2010; Roomi, 2013) looking at how Islam shapes entrepreneurship at different levels of the economy whilst encouraging and enabling entrepreneurial activities.

The authors in the field have investigated the Islamic ethical approach of doing business from two perspectives: first, the institutional approach – emphasising upon the need for Islamic financial and banking institutions; and second, the individual approach – for entrepreneurs to “adhere to Islamic, ethical values while conducting everyday business activities” (Kayed and Hassan, 2010: 403). However, no study has been conducted so far, to map out different aspects of entrepreneurship (characteristics, skills and practices) with Islamic teachings (Quran and Sunnah) or to determine the relationship between entrepreneurial success and practising of Islamic principles. This project aims to fill this gap.

Supervisors: Dr Muhammad Azam Roomi and Dr Stephanie Hussels

Application Details: The PhD candidate should hold a minimum 2.1 class undergraduate degree in business and management, sociology, psychology, social psychology, anthropology or related discipline and have passed, or expect to have passed by autumn 2015, a Master’s degree or equivalent research experience in a work setting. See Admission Requirements for English language requirements.

Funding Details: Funding may be available on a competitive basis through the Cranfield School of Management studentship scheme.

Deadline: Expressions of interest alongside a CV are invited via email to: muhammad.roomi@cranfield.ac.uk and stephanie.hussels@cranfield.ac.uk mid-April 2015 for bursary applications or end of July 2015 for self-funded applications.

References:
Adas, E.B. (2006). The Making of Entrepreneurial Islam and the Islamic Spirit of Capitalism. Journal for Cultural Research, 10 (2): 113-137.
Basu, A. and Altinay, E. (2002). The interaction between culture and entrepreneurship in London’s immigrant businesses. International Small Business Journal, 20(4): 371-393.
Guemuesay, A.A. (2012). Boundaries and knowledge in a Sufi Dhikr Circle, Journal of Management Development, 31(10): 1079-1089.
Guemuesay, A.A. (2014). Entrepreneurship from an Islamic Perspective, Journal of Business Ethics (Forthcoming). Available at http://linl.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10551-014-2223-7.
Gundolf, K. and Filser, M. (2013). Management Research and Religion: A Citation Analysis. Journal of Business Ethics, 112(1): 177-185.
Kayed, R. N. and Hassan, K. (2010). Islamic entrepreneurship. London: Routledge.
Neubert, M. J. (2013). Entrepreneurs Feel Closer to God Than the Rest of Us Do. Harvard Business Review, 91 (10): 32-33.
Rinallo, D., Scott, L. and MacLaran, P. (2013). Consumption and Spirituality. New York: Routledge.
Roomi M.A. (2013). Entrepreneurial Capital, Social Values and Islamic Traditions: Exploring the Growth of Women-owned Enterprises in Pakistan. International Small Business Journal, 31 (2) 175-191.
Roomi, M. A. and Harrison, P. (2010). Behind the veil: women-only entrepreneurship training in Pakistan. International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, 2(2): 150 – 172.
Temporal, P. (2011). Islamic Branding and Marketing. Asia: Wiley.

Thurs 19th March: Cranfield School of Management Doctoral Open Day

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PhD Project: Causes & Consequences of Income Inequality in 21st Century

British Grand Prix 2012 - Silverstone

Implications for society, government and business.

Income distribution has been at the forefront of academic and policy debate for many decades in many countries. Year after year, the UN has reported a growing inequality gap in all countries, developed and developing. Such a growing disparity is currently particularly pronounced in the USA where those at the top 1% of the income pyramid have witnessed a three-fold increase in real income since 1980 – while the living standards of the average worker have barely risen.

Some would argue that this growing inequality gives top earners greater ability to influence the political process (through think-tanks, lobbying, campaign funds).
The purpose of this research is to explore in depth the causes, consequences and policy implications of rising income inequality. The research may be conducted at a national level or on the basis of a comparative study. It is likely to be empirically based using official statistics.
Within this context we seek to provide an international platform to assess and consider the scale and implications of the growing income gap across the world from the standpoint of society, government and business.

Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Inequality and Poverty/Dynamics of Inequality and Poverty
  • Economic Growth and Inequality
  • Measurement and Causes of Income Inequality
  • Socioeconomic Implications of Income Inequality
  • Inequality, Welfare and Income Distribution
  • Fiscal Policy, Inequality and Welfare
  • Heterodox Perspectives on Income Distribution
  • Inequality and the Financial Crisis
  • Inequality Between Countries
  • Government Policies and Inequality
  • Neoliberalism
  • Income Distribution and Economic Crisis

Supervisors: Dr Constantinos Alexiou and Professor Joseph Nellis

Application Details: The PhD candidate should hold a minimum 2.1 class undergraduate degree in economics, finance or related discipline and have passed, or expect to have passed by autumn 2015, a Master’s degree or equivalent research experience in a work setting. See Admission Requirements for English language requirements.

Funding Details: Funding may be available on a competitive basis through the Cranfield School of Management studentship scheme.

Deadline: Expressions of interest alongside a CV are invited via email to: constantinos.alexiou@cranfield.ac.uk and j.g.nellis@cranfield.ac.uk by mid-April 2015 for bursary applications or end of July 2015 for self-funded applications.

Thurs 19th March: Cranfield School of Management Doctoral Open Day

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PhD Project: Impact of FDI Flows on Economic Growth

British Grand Prix 2012 - Silverstone

In recent decades, globalization has accelerated the scale of FDI flows into, and between, countries. Global deregulation of financial and goods markets has accelerated the integration and interdependency of nations. These flows have been particularly important as drivers of economic growth in both developing and emerging economies.

The relationship between FDI flows and economic growth is rather complex and multi-dimensional. The purpose of this research is to provide an opportunity to explore the significance of FDI flows and the implications for long-term sustainable economic development.

The research will be of value to national governments and international organizations in that it will seek to identify the determinants of FDI. This has direct implication for national economic planning.

There will be an emphasis on econometric modelling which may be conducted at a single country level or across many countries, either developed or developing. Examples of topics which may be addressed in this research are as follows:
1) Modelling the determinants of both inward and outward FDI flows
2) The mediating effects of FDI flows on national or regional economic growth
3) Policy implications for national or international organizations

Supervisors: Professor Joseph Nellis and Dr Constantinos Alexiou

Application Details: The PhD candidate should hold a minimum 2.1 class undergraduate degree in economics, finance or related discipline and have passed, or expect to have passed by autumn 2015, a Master’s degree or equivalent research experience in a work setting. See Admission Requirements for English language requirements.

Funding Details: Funding may be available on a competitive basis through the Cranfield School of Management studentship scheme.

Deadline: Expressions of interest alongside a CV are invited via email to: j.g.nellis@cranfield.ac.uk and constantinos.alexiou@cranfield.ac.uk by mid-April 2015 for bursary applications or end of July 2015 for self-funded applications.

Thurs 19th March: Cranfield School of Management Doctoral Open Day

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PhD Project: Supply ChainFinance for SMEs (Grocery Sector)

British Grand Prix 2012 - Silverstone

Supply chain finance has attracted great interest from various companies and stakeholders. However, there has been limited research undertaken to address smaller and medium sized organisations – most research to date tends to focus on large organisations.

There is considerable merit in examining supply chain finance for SMEs as these companies have different demands, operations, processes and requirements compared to larger organisations. These differences can then affect supply chain finance structures and performance.

This PhD topic will examine these points of difference and will aim to cross-compare financial performance between micro, small and medium-sized organisations – focusing on the grocery sector.

Supervisors: Professor Michael Bourlakis and Dr Simon Templar 

Application Details: The PhD candidate should hold a minimum 2.1 class undergraduate degree in business and management, sociology, psychology, social psychology, anthropology or related discipline and have passed, or expect to have passed by autumn 2015, a Master’s degree or equivalent research experience in a work setting. In this project ethnographic research methods will be particularly important. See Admission Requirements for English language requirements.

Funding Details: Funding may be available on a competitive basis through the Cranfield School of Management studentship scheme.

Deadline: Expressions of interest alongside a CV are invited via email to: m.bourlakis@cranfield.ac.uk and simon.templar@cranfield.ac.uk by mid-April 2015 for bursary applications or end of July 2015 for self-funded applications.

Thurs 19th March: Cranfield School of Management Doctoral Open Day

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